Both animal- and plant-based proteins have earned loyal followers, and these groups have strong opinions about protein choices. The reasoning for protein choice is often personal, and studies have found links to curiosity, taste, environmental and health concerns as motivators. Do you prefer a choice cut of steak, or are you looking for ways to reduce meat consumption? Infographic about the protein debate with statistics from Mintel

There has been a lot of buzz around protein preferences – from advertisements during the Super Bowl in the U.S. to flexitarianism and blended meat and vegetable options in the E.U. Opinions and conversations abound with consumers and food manufacturers weighing in, but sentiments are wide and differing. This month we are sharing articles discussing the trend for different types of protein sources.

What we are reading:

SURVEY: CURIOSITY IS MAIN REASON FOR PEOPLE TRYING PLANT-BASED MEAT ALTERNATIVES
Animal- and Plant-Based Proteins

Jeff Gelski, Meat + Poultry [Published February 4, 2020]

“Curiosity, even more so than environmental or health concerns, ranked as the No. 1 reason why many consumers try plant-based meat alternatives.” This article discusses the results of a survey conducted by the International Food Information Council Foundation about preferences for both animal- and plant-based proteins as they relate to meat analogues. This includes perception of environmental concerns, price, taste and curiosity to try something new.

MEAT ALTERNATIVES WARNING: ‘MORE EVIDENCE IS NEEDED ON HEALTH AND SUSTAINABILITY CLAIMS’
Animal- and Plant-Based Proteins

Oliver Morrison, Food Navigator [Published January 8, 2020]

Regardless of a consumers reasoning for choosing a meat alternative, better transparency of the process and labeling are needed for consumers to be able to make informed choices about what they are buying. “‘In an ideal world, we would like to see food companies produce alternative meat products that are healthy and sustainable, for conventional meat production to be focused on greater sustainability, and for people to make informed choices towards healthier, sustainable diets,’ said Hugh Whittall, Director of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.”

IS MEAT BAD FOR YOU? DISAGREEMENT FLOURISHES OVER THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF ANIMAL PROTEIN
Animal- and Plant-Based Proteins

Katy Askew, Food Navigator [Published February 4, 2020]

“What should be communicated is that red meat is good for health, so long as it is eaten in moderation,” said Professor Alice Stanton, cardiovascular pharmacologist from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Another study was released stating that processed meats can be bad for your health, but conflicting studies found that high amounts of protein, vitamin B12, EPA and DHA in the first 1,000 days of life contribute importantly to normal brain and body development.

NOW IS THE TIME FOR REGULATION TO SUPPORT SUSTAINABLE, PLANT-BASED EATING
Animal- and Plant-Based Proteins

Paul Whitehouse, The Grocer [Published January 14, 2020]

Regulations around the labeling of plant-based foods and beverages are gaining criticism as plant-based supporters urge names like ‘almond milk’ and ‘plant butter’ so consumers will have an idea of the product they are substituting. The common argument in the EU is that these products should be labeled without a dairy counterpart so as not to be confused as a dairy product. This article discusses both sides of the labeling controversy.

Learn more about Kalsec natural antioxidant, color, spice and herb flavor extracts for meat, poultry and seafood solutions and natural color and flavor extracts for plant-based proteins.

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